Be Generous With Your: Time, Talents, Treasure

Today’s the 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Find the Mass Readings here: 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, November 11, 2018

My takeaway:

Today our pastor gave a great homily about being generous with our time, talents, and treasure.

“We’re all called to be generous, and that means going out of our comfort zone for the sake of others. In the readings, Jesus didn’t praise the people who gave out of their surplus. He praised the people who gave when it hurt.”

Featured Five Takeaways:

@PrayerWineChocolate

Amy had a story that had me chuckling, then dropped a powerful truth bomb.

“The Gospel reminded me that it is most important to believe that when times are tough. It’s easier to believe when there is surplus.”

Let’s pray to be more like those widows – who trusted God with everything!

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Soooo today someone asked how my social media venture was going. To be a little more specific, she asked if it was helping with our income yet. My husband quickly responded no while I said a lot of uhhh, well, not exactly. …blah blah blah As I drove to Mass, I wondered if I should be giving serious thought to getting a "real job" again. It's not what I desire…but I am a wife and mother and I just don't know. Then, the first reading. God will provide. I've preached that many times. I've believed it in the past. The Gospel reminded me that it is most important to believe that when times are tough. It's easier to believe when there is surplus. I admire the faith of those widows. I pray to be more like them. #MyMassTakeaway #youcantbehalfasaint #CarholicMass #Catholicsonline #Godwillprovide

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@GinnyKochis

I love Ginny’s writing, because she’s so good at taking her tough days and turning them around to inspire others.

“Sundays are the days when we have nothing left to give. But we give anyway, and you know what? He sees it. And no, he doesn’t care about the stains on your shirt. What he cares most about is the woman he is fashioning and the lives she keeps in her care.
Your jar of flour shall not go empty, nor your jug of oil run dry.”

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I went through mass this morning with breakfast on my shirt, only I didn’t notice it until the Penitential Rite. As my husband said later it certainly didn’t affect the validity of the sacrament, but it did have an impact on the validity of my sense of self. Where I had walked into Mass with hopeful spirit, I spent the second half slogging through the knowledge that my outward appearance conveyed an inner storm. I think you can probably identify with how I was feeling. As moms to intense, differently-wired kids, Sundays are the days when we have nothing left to give. By the time we’ve made it through a week of forged discoveries, soothed meltdowns, and anxiety-fueled rages, the prospect of one more need, one more act of service makes us feel like we might die. And then we hear about the widows, from the Old Testament and the New. They literally have nothing left, and yet they give it to the Lord: 'The jar of flour shall not go empty, nor the jug of oil run dry, until the day when the LORD sends rain upon the earth.'" Sundays are the days when we have nothing left to give. But we give anyway, and you know what? He sees it. And no, he doesn’t care about the stains on your shirt. What he cares most about is the woman he is fashioning and the lives she keeps in her care. Your jar of flour shall not go empty, nor your jug of oil run dry.

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@BeautifulCamouflagedMess

Anni’s beautiful words today encourage us to have radical trust in God.

“Dear God, please grant me the courage to be like the nameless widow in today’s reading. Grant me the courage to place radical trust in You, with faith You will provide in all areas of my life. Amen.”

@SurprisedByMarriage

Jen and Logan remind us to be self-sacrificial in marriage. I love that they bring up this topic, because that’s something I pray for every day!

They point out that love hurts a little, and challenge us to “Give more than you think you can give!”

@Mary_Haseltine

You know I love Mary’s chalkboard verses.

This week she reminds us that even though Jesus died and rose from the dead and won our salvation, everything’s not perfect yet.

“We still have knots upon knots that only He can undo. We’re living in the messy, beautiful, in-between, the both/and that salvation was then and not yet.”

The choices we make matter, and Mary challenges us to be more like the widows in the readings – giving everything for Christ.

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We believe He will come again. Sometimes we forget that, I think. Sometimes I don’t get why His first coming and the Redemption of the Paschal Mystery didn’t fix everything. There’s still sin. We still have terrible messes that only He could clean up. We still have knots upon knots that only He can undo. We’re living in the messy, beautiful, in-between, the both/and that salvation was then and not yet. + This has been on my heart so much the last few months. I've grown more eager in my await of Him and I pray that I am not foolish for that desire but that I am ready. The reminder is abundant in Scripture that we know not the day or hour and as Advent approaches, that reminder in the liturgy will only become more fervent. + It's so easy to forget that whether it is the Second Coming or our own deaths, the choices we've made on this earth will matter. The fallout from our choices will matter. And in the meantime, I pray that I can be like that widow giving all – everything – to Him. My ego, my plans, my choices, my money, my projects, my relationships…all Yours, Jesus. Until you come again in Your glory. + + + #SundayScriptureSnapshot #Scripture #mymasstakeaway #liturgicalliving #sundayreadings #catholic

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Your turn:

I want to know your Mass Takeaway too! Comment with your thoughts on the readings, your pastor’s homily, or anything that struck you during your time at Mass.

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