#mymasstakeaway 24th Sunday in ordinary time

Today’s the 24rd Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Find the Mass Readings here: 24rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, September 17, 2017

My takeaway:

#MyMassTakeaway: "The Lord is kind and merciful, slow to anger, and rich in compassion." . This response gave me all the good feelings today. Until it hit me who was doing the talking. It was David, the Psalmist, an Old Testament character. . He lives in a different world than I do. His understanding of the "Lord" is not quite the same as what comes to mind for me. . I prayed this response with the "I-died-for-you," "forgive-him-seventy-times-seven-times" Jesus on my mind. . But David didn't know Jesus yet. He wasn't revealed at his time in history. No, the "Lord" he was referencing was the first person of the Trinity: God the Creator. . The "kick-them-out-of-Eden" God. The "send-a-flood," "fire-and-brimstone," "forty-extra-years-in-the-desert" God. . THIS is the slow to anger God? . How did such a prayer rise to David's lips? How did he not perceive God as the hot-tempered, quick-to-punish, anger-flaring God I so often see when I read the Old Testament? . Because David is humble. David KNOWS the weight of his own sins. He knows that he owes God an infinite debt. David knew that God's anger was well-deserved. That God would be justified in obliterating every human from the face of the earth to satisfy His justice if He so desired. . But God chose to give His people life. To keep forgiving them and watching over them, despite all their offenses against Him. To promise them the Savior. . This is the reality check I needed today. I need to remember that the ever-forgiving Jesus of the New Testament is the SAME God as the justice-exacting Creator of the Old Testament. The only difference? My place in history. My perspective. . And since forgiveness comes so easy to us today – pop into confession, list my sins, say three Hail Marys, boom – I sometimes lose my healthy sense of guilt. I forget the weight of my sins before God. . Today, I allow David's words to reawaken my knowledge of my infinite offense before God. And my awe at God's infinite goodness and mercy. He is indeed slow to anger and rich in compassion.

A post shared by To Jesus Sincerely (@tojesussincerely) on

Thoughts from my blogging friends:

Today's Gospel talks about forgiveness. Jesus says to forgive someone seventy-seven times. In marriage there are many opportunities for forgiveness (let's just say daily). One of the beautiful parts of marriage is living in a spirit of forgiveness and seeing that other person as they really are – a child of God. That's why we pray for the grace of the sacrament and look to God as our model of forgiveness and mercy. Pope Francis in his Angelus Address today said, "The Lord is full of love and He wants to offer it to us, but he cannot do so if we close our hearts to loving others." We can have hearts that forgive easily the wrongs others commit against. As Christians we have the unique opportunity to share the Father's merciful love with others, especially starting in our own home. #mymasstakeaway #catholiclifestyle #catholicsofinstagram #forgiveness #goodgoodfather #sacramentofmarriage #livingthegospel #shereadstruth #popefrancis #marriedlife #glorifygod #mercifullove #catholicinsta #sundaygospel #sundayscripture #wordofgod

A post shared by Bethany Swanson (@strengthenmyheart__) on

Taking home a passionate homily today on the gospel reading from Matthew 18:21-35 "Lord, how many times shall I forgive…" The main point of Fr. Paul's homily was that with great inflicted wounds forgiveness is a very hard task, it takes a great amount of courage and grace to ask God to help tear down the walls we built around the wound, the safety walls, the I -don't -want-to-go-there wall, the you-have-to-pay-for-it wall. It might seem safe, but the wall cuts God out as well and there will be no true healing possible. You can be honest: Lord, I don't want to forgive, I can't, but please make me be willing to be willing! . A few weeks ago I was pondering over forgiveness and was thinking of Jesus' agony, of the fact that He had to absorb all sin, all evil – past, present and future- with such compassion, without a trace of negativity, had to be done perfectly… Our Jesus… . . #MyMasstakeaway #thewordofgod #drawclosertogod #lovegod #godinspired #openjourney #religiousart #christianart #biblejournaling #faith #faithjournal #art #ingridblixt #TB2G #forgive

A post shared by Ingrid Blixt (@ingridblixt) on

Your turn:

I want to know your Mass takeaway too! Comment with your thoughts on the readings, your pastor’s homily, or anything that struck you during your time at Mass.

One thought on “#mymasstakeaway 24th Sunday in ordinary time

  1. Whoa, you’re kinda blowing my mind with the fact that David didn’t know Jesus. I never even thought about that!! I know it’s totally common sense but I tend to forget that everyone in the Old Testament just knows God the Father. This is something I will be reflecting on when I read Scripture now, so thank you!

    Like

Share your thoughts:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s